1950s JACQUES FATH linen three piece dress xs | new spring summer
1950s JACQUES FATH linen three piece dress xs | new spring summer
1950s JACQUES FATH linen three piece dress xs | new spring summer
1950s JACQUES FATH linen three piece dress xs | new spring summer
1950s JACQUES FATH linen three piece dress xs | new spring summer
1950s JACQUES FATH linen three piece dress xs | new spring summer
1950s JACQUES FATH linen three piece dress xs | new spring summer
1950s JACQUES FATH linen three piece dress xs | new spring summer
1950s JACQUES FATH linen three piece dress xs | new spring summer
1950s JACQUES FATH linen three piece dress xs | new spring summer

1950s JACQUES FATH linen three piece dress xs | new spring summer

Condition Chart

m i n t : pristine with no signs of wear- possibly deadstock

e x c e l l e n t : signs of normal wear and age- no obvious flaws

v e r y g o o d : noted minor flaws that may have been already repaired - very wearable

g o o d : many noted minor flaws and/or mends -wearable

f a i r : numerous noted flaws and mends, some significant - still wearable

A truly remarkable piece of fashion history! Stunning 1950's Jacques Fath three piece dress done in blue/gray irish linen. The pieces include the dress, belt and tuxedo bib with attached belt. Dress has curved sleeves with slits, fitted waist and full skirt with front kangaroo pockets with angled flaps. Matching belt hooks in back. White linen tuxedo bib has buttons and an attached cummerbund belt that connects with a huge buckle in back. Back metal zipper. Unlined.

Fath was known for his hourglass shapes, plunging necklines, tiny waists and full skirts. It has been suggested that Fath even inspired Dior's New Look. Certainly, Fath designed some of the sexiest and most glamorous dresses to come out of Paris. A Fath dress would often feature a molded bodice that would show off a slender waist and emphasize the bosom and hips. He favored irregular necklines and often drew attention to cleavage. His skirts were either very slim or very full, characterized by a myriad of pleating or draping. Fath worked directly with the fabric, draping it on his models. Fath's style was best known for its glamour. He often used diagonal lines, asymmetrical draping, and floating panels to give a sense of movement. Angled collars and pockets, slanted or zigzagging skirts, bustles or fans jutting out from tight dresses, tucks, tiers and knife pleats all added to the unique quality of his clothes. He had a great sense of color, often using combinations such as bright blues and greens. Fath's glamorous style had a wide appeal, and in 1948 he signed an agreement with the American manufacturer, Joseph Halpert. Henceforth, in addition to his own couture collections, Fath produced a low-priced American line as well.

Because of Fath's untimely death at age 42, his role in the world of post-war haute couture is sometimes overlooked. During his lifetime, however, Fath was considered a leading Parisian couturier.
After the war, Fath moved quickly to establish an American clientele. In 1948, Fath and his wife toured the United States. Publicity for the tour included details of Genevieve’s extensive Jacques Fath travel wardrobe. Consisting of 35 ensembles and appropriate accessories, it was persuasive proof of Fath's talent. During this visit, Fath cemented his business relationship with US clothing manufacturer Joseph Halpert. Under the terms of their agreement, Fath began designing two annual collections, about 40 designs total, for mass-market production and distribution throughout the United States.

At home, Fath was a noted host, throwing lavish parties at his home outside of Paris. With 40 rooms, Fath's roomy chateau accommodated both intimate cocktail parties and large formal balls. Jacques and Genevieve were frequent hosts, entertaining several times each month. Guest lists were a social and economic jumble, including cafe society, celebrities, and aristocrats. Accordingly, their annual champagne bill was astronomical—$3,000 in 1949!
Jacques Fath employed a polite and respectful manner with his workers that assured their loyalty. He called his women seamstresses by their first name, never forgot their birthday, and offered wedding dresses to female workers getting married. They respectfully called him "Monsieur Jacques."
The 500 plus employees were grief-stricken when Jacques Fath died of leukemia on November 13, 1954. Over 3,000 people, mainly women, attended his funeral in Paris.

Brand: Jacques Fath / Joseph Halpert
Size on tag: None
Fits like: XXS
Color: blue/gray
Material: irish linen
Condition: Excellent Vintage: A tiny dark cluster of dots on the back side of skirt..it did not come out with a hand launder and seems to be maybe a dye flaw in the linen fabric.

✂-----Measurements
Bust (underarm seam) : 33"
Waist: 24.25"
Hips: open
Total length: 43"